Solomon Islands – Student Medical Placement

Dr Jo Grey

TMA Brisbane

Earlier this year, I accepted an invitation to spend two weeks on Guadalcanal Island, part of the Solomon Islands group supervising medical students from Bond University on an elective placement.  The students were seeking a doctor to accompany them who would be happy to work alongside and supervise them in a tropical, low-resource environment. I happily accepted, having worked and travelled previously in other Pacific nations, but never visited the Solomon Islands – what a great opportunity!  What a challenge!
The placement was a student initiative, organised by Bushfire, the Bond University Rural Health Club.  This year is only the second year that this student-run initiative has taken place, following on from the successful inaugural trip in 2018.

Read More »

Staying safe during an Ebola mission

Dr Saschveen Singh, Capstone Health, Wembley

Ebola Staff health: not your average travel medicine story.

Since the West African outbreak made international headlines in 2015-2017, Ebola has been shrouded in myth. Many had forgotten its existence.

But the recent major outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has put the disease centre-stage again.

When I was placed at an Ebola treatment centre with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF, Doctors without Borders) my friends and family first asked me why on earth I wanted to go there; and, second, what I would do to stay safe.

Read More »

Altitude Illness in the Andes  

Dr Jason Rajakulendran, TMA Sandringham.

A recent holiday to the Andean mountains of Ecuador & Peru highlighted to me the importance of careful preparation for any time spent at altitude. The Andes as the world’s second highest mountain range, allow relatively easy flight access to stunning high-altitude regions and active pursuits. As I climbed above 5000m on the glacial volcano of Cotopaxi, I started feeling the dramatic effects of altitude illness despite some efforts to acclimatise. Fortunately, I was able to recover quickly and enjoy the remainder of the holiday. Please read on for advice on how to help prevent and manage altitude illness when travelling to high places.

Read More »

TMA Group Published Research

Members of the Travel Medicine Alliance are committed to best practice travel medicine and to that end, we have a commitment to undertaking and publishing research in the field of travel medicine.

Our team includes Dr Luis Furuya Kanamori,  Dr Colleen Lau and Dr Deb Mills 

 

Some of the publications that our research group have produced are listed below (the most recent publications are at the bottom).

Read More »

Babies, Bali and “I Do”

Dr Julie Burke TMA Yeppoon

Destination weddings in Bali for Australians are extremely popular. Young  Aussie couples with their love of the great out doors, beach and sand can easily access the many wedding planners and resorts specializing in magical and seemingly less costly venues for tying the knot.  More often these couples already have their own little ones, have guests with young families and mums to be; and grandparents tagging along for the ride as baby sitters.  In the excitement of the weddings planning, friends and family’s travel health needs are often overlooked – especially regarding ZIKA.

Read More »

Antarctica: Icebergs and secret weapon

Dr Cormac Carey,
Medical Director, Toowoomba.

After sampling the wonderful delights of Buenos Aires we flew South to Ushuaia, the southernmost city in the world. Here, we boarded our expedition vessel RCGS ( Royal Canadian Geographical Society) Resolute, our home for the next nine nights on a calm Friday afternoon.
The weather certainly allayed the potential for the dreaded sea sickness.  Having been previously severely affected on several fishing trips,
I had researched all possible preventive options and was armed with an arsenal.

Read More »

Measles and Travellers

Dr Michael Long (TMA Narre Warren)

 

Measles in Australia is almost always imported by travellers; there have been many outbreaks of this highly contagious disease in 2018-19 in many countries. Travellers who were born after 1966 (aged under 52?) need to ensure they have had 2 doses of the measles vaccine or documented measles disease or a blood test to confirm immunity.

 

Read More »

Medical illnesses can present serious challenges overseas

by Dr Daniel Priest and Dr Donald Leitch – Shoal Bay, NSW

Have you seen random articles on Facebook etc explaining the things that annoy flight attendants? There is quite a list: clipping your toenails … who does that on a plane?? Going barefoot… that’s smelly bad behaviour. Clicking fingers for attention, requesting a temperature change, not bringing a pen (to fill in the customs forms on international flights) to name just a few.

When you travel, especially overseas, there is so much medical advice we can give. Travel doctors are passionate about giving good, relevant, up to date advice in a comprehensive way… not just a few shots and something for malaria. It is such a privilege to be of assistance to help you have a safe and pleasant trip… but we want to do it well… and that takes time and attention.

Read More »

 An African Safari

Potential travellers are now thinking about the Australian winter in 2019 and many are thinking of safaris in Africa. Common destinations include Kruger National park in South Africa, and other fabulous destinations in Botswana, Zambia, & Kenya. They will have a wonderful time, but all should consult their Travel Medicine professional before travelling, ideally at least 6 weeks in advance.

Make sure your tetanus vaccine is up to date.

Read More »

Typhoid Vaccination

Written by Dr Diana Gillatt, Tanunda Medical Centre

 

So what is Typhoid Fever and where is it a problem?

Typhoid is a nasty bacterial infection you contract from contaminated food or drink, sometimes even from dust.. You would develop a fever, headache, tiredness, general aches, a rash and abdominal pain with upset bowels. It can be mistaken for malaria or other tropical illnesses. Often Typhoid will be serious enough to land you in hospital.

It tends to occur in countries with warm climates and that have poorer sanitation standards for their water and sewerage.  Your travel doctor will let you know if your planned trip will put you at risk of catching Typhoid.

Worldwide millions of cases still occur every year, and many thousands of people die. So it’s a good thing to avoid!

Vaccination is recommended, and there are different options, some vaccination can be given orally instead of by injection..

Protection from vaccination takes a couple of weeks to build up to it’s full effect so you need to seek medical advice ideally 6 weeks before departure..

 

Read More »

Travel Health Information

Creative Commons License
This work by Dr Deb The Travel Doctor Pty Ltd (ABN 75 624 360 247) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.thetraveldoctor.com.au/website_terms_conditions.htm.

Website Terms and Conditions | Governing policy | Sitemap| Privacy Policy

Website Developed by Big Blue Creative